What Are Three Key Legal Principles When Administering Medications?

The 4 Categories of MedicationGeneral Sales List (GSL) GSLs are a type of medicine that have few legal restrictions.

Pharmacy Medicines.

Pharmacy Medicines are only available to purchase behind the counter at a pharmacy.

Prescription Only Medicines.

Controlled Drugs.Nov 28, 2018.

What are the 5 rights of patients?

Your rights as a hospital patient:Right to Accessibility, availability and continuity of care.Right to Dignity and Privacy of Patient.Right to ensure Safety.Right to Confidentiality of Information.Right to Refusal of treatment.Right to Information & education.More items…

What are the 4 main groups of drugs and give an example of each?

There are four main groups of drugs, divided according to their major effects, plus a few substances that do not easily fit into any category….The main categories are:stimulants (e.g. cocaine)depressants (e.g. alcohol)opium-related painkillers (e.g. heroin)hallucinogens (e.g. LSD)

What are the principles of medication administration?

Rights of Medication AdministrationRight patient. Check the name on the order and the patient. … Right medication. Check the medication label. … Right dose. Check the order. … Right route. Again, check the order and appropriateness of the route ordered. … Right time. Check the frequency of the ordered medication. … Right documentation. … Right reason. … Right response.May 27, 2011

What is the 10 rights of medication administration?

The essential concepts for PRN medication training are the 10 “rights” of medicines management: right patient, right reason, right drug, right route, right time, right dose, right form, right action, right documentation and right response [85] .

What do the 6 Rs stand for?

6Rs: Rethink, Refuse, Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, Repair are all useful terms to explore reducing the impact of technology on people and the environment.

What are the 10 rights of the patient?

Let’s take a look at your rights.The Right to Be Treated with Respect.The Right to Obtain Your Medical Records.The Right to Privacy of Your Medical Records.The Right to Make a Treatment Choice.The Right to Informed Consent.The Right to Refuse Treatment.The Right to Make Decisions About End-of-Life Care.

What are the 8 routes of drug administration?

Oral administration. This is the most frequently used route of drug administration and is the most convenient and economic. … Sublingual. … Rectal administration. … Topical administration. … Parenteral administration. … Intravenous injection.Nov 19, 2007

What is difference between medicine and medication?

A medication is any drug or potion in any form that is used to fight a disease or heal a condition. Medicine and medication, when discussing the use of drugs and potions, mean the same thing.

What are the three categories of medication?

The Act defines three categories of medicine: prescription only medicines (POM), which are available only from a pharmacist if prescribed by an appropriate practitioner; pharmacy medicines (P), available only from a pharmacist but without a prescription; and general sales list (GSL) medicines which may be bought from …

What is the first thing you must do prior to administration of any medication?

Read the medication order carefully. Make sure that the medication name on the order matches the medication name on the label. Read the medication log carefully. Make sure that the medication name on the label, the medication order and medication log match before giving the medication.

What four things must you check prior to administering medication?

Medication must:Be in its original container.Have a clear readable and original label.Have the child’s name clearly on the label.Have any instructions attached.Have verbal or written instructions provided by the child’s registered medical practioner.

What are the 3 Befores?

Right patient. Right medication. Right dose. Right route. Right time/frequency. Right reason. Right documentation. Right response.

How many classes of medications are there?

In the world of illicit and abused drug use, there are essentially 7 different types of drugs. Each has its own set of characteristics, effects, dangers, and side effects.

What are the six classifications of drugs?

When considering only their chemical makeup, there are six main classifications of drugs: alcohol, opioids, benzodiazepines, cannabinoids, barbiturates, and hallucinogens. Out of all the thousands of drugs that are out there, both prescription and illegal, each one can be categorized under one of these six headings.

What are the 3 rights of medication administration?

One of the recommendations to reduce medication errors and harm is to use the “five rights”: the right patient, the right drug, the right dose, the right route, and the right time.

What are the 4 basic rules for medication administration?

The “rights” of medication administration include right patient, right drug, right time, right route, and right dose. These rights are critical for nurses.

What are the 6 R’s of medication administration?

something known as the ‘6 R’s’, which stands for right resident, right medicine, right route, right dose, right time, resident’s right to refuse.

What are the 7 R of medication administration?

To ensure safe medication preparation and administration, nurses are trained to practice the “7 rights” of medication administration: right patient, right drug, right dose, right time, right route, right reason and right documentation [12, 13].

What are the 2 types of medicines?

Types of medicinesLiquid. The active part of the medicine is combined with a liquid to make it easier to take or better absorbed. … Tablet. The active ingredient is combined with another substance and pressed into a round or oval solid shape. … Capsules. … Topical medicines. … Suppositories. … Drops. … Inhalers. … Injections.More items…

What are the 5 rights and 3 checks?

These five rights refer to the right patient, right medication, right dose, right route, and right time. It is important that these are followed and checked during the process of administering medications to prevent harm and maintain patient safety.